Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

Pack Leadership Structure

The Chartered Organization

Every Cub Scout pack belongs to an organization with interests similar to those of the BSA. This organization, which might be a church, school, community organization, or group of interested citizens, receives a charter from the BSA to use the Scouting program. This chartered organization provides a suitable meeting place, adult leadership, supervision, and opportunities for a healthy Scouting life for the boys under its care.

Chartered Organization Representative

The chartered organization representative is the direct contact between the pack and the chartered organization. This individual is also the organization’s contact with the district committee and the local council. The chartered organization representative may become a member of the district committee and is a voting member of the council. If the chartered organization has more than one unit, one representative serves them all.

The Pack Committee

Every pack is under the supervision of a pack committee, which consists of at least three members (chair, secretary, and treasurer). By handling administrative and support tasks, the pack committee allows the Cubmaster, den leaders, and their assistants to focus on working directly with the Cub Scouts.

The Pack Trainer

The goal of the pack trainer is to have 100 percent of the pack leaders trained in their position responsibilities. New leaders and adult family members should receive orientation within one week of joining the pack, and leaders should receive position-specific training within 30 days.

Cubmaster

Everything the Cubmaster does is aimed at helping the individual boy. Securing strong leaders, planning den and pack activities, advising other leaders and adult family members—these are all ways in which the Cubmaster affects the kind of Cub Scouting each boy in the pack is offered. The Cubmaster directly influences the lives of individual boys by keeping in mind that boys can become better through Cub Scouting.

Assistant Cubmaster

Every pack should have at least one assistant Cubmaster. In most packs, two or three will be helpful, allowing the Cubmaster to divide responsibilities. At least one assistant Cubmaster should be able to replace the Cubmaster’s position in case of an emergency. The assistant Cubmaster is recommended by the Cubmaster, approved by the pack committee and chartered organization, and registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

Den Leaders

Cub Scout den leaders work directly with Cub Scouts and their parents/guardians to execute the Cub Scouting program in the den. May be a parent or guardian of a boy in the den. Recommended by the Cubmaster after consultation with parents and guardians of the Cub Scouts involved, and approved by the pack committee and chartered organization. Registered as an adult leader of the BSA.

Assistant Cub Scout Den Leaders

The assistant Cub Scout den leader shares the work of the Cub Scout den leader and may be called upon to serve as a family contact or record keeper, or to handle other details of den operation. Each den should have at least one assistant den leader, and more if needed.

Cub Scout Den Chief

An older Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer. Selected by the senior patrol leader and Scoutmaster, Varsity Scout Coach, or Venturing Advisor at the request of the Cubmaster. Approved by the Cubmaster and pack committee for recommendation to the den leader. Registered as a youth member of a troop, team, or crew.

© 2021 Pack 323 - Boy Scouts of America | WordPress Admin